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Research & Learning Blog

  • Posted on Thursday, December 4, 2014 - 10:27am

    lynda logo

    New! Lynda.com provides access to over 3,000 video courses in technology and business led by industry experts. Learn something new at your own pace.

    Expand your brain from the comfort of home in topics ranging from the very basics of Microsoft Office, Windows and the Mac OS to the technicalities of website building.

    Click here to sign in with your library card!

    First time users will be required to create a Lynda.com profile.

    For Wilmington Memorial Library cardholders only.

  • Posted on Saturday, November 8, 2014 - 10:17am

     
    Freegal is a great source of free music. However, if you're using the iPad app you could end up with music in that app that's not in your iTunes library. But fear not, we can help! All you need is your iPad, its USB cable, and another computer. Here's how 

  • Posted on Thursday, July 24, 2014 - 3:30pm

    Last night, we held a Microsoft Word 2010 introductory class. We went over "The Ribbon" and all the fun stuff you can do with a Word Document. So much stuff can you do, that it can be overwhelming.

    So as a way to focus on a few features, and get some hands-on exercise, we walked through create a recipe. It helped to familiarize everyone with such features as:

    • Bold/Italics
    • Font style/size
    • Font alignment
    • Bulleted/numbered lists

    More importantly, it got folks navigating from The Ribbon to different parts of the document. For those of you that wish you were there, or those of you that wish you had a way to brush up on your Word skills, I've uploaded the exercise. You can find it here. Print it out and then open up Word. Then you can go through the steps to create the recipe for yourself!

  • Posted on Monday, July 14, 2014 - 10:46am

    The internet is full of good data...once you get passed all the Justin Beiber updates. But there's a big difference between data and information.

    Data is a blog post by a sociology professor describing what Anthropology is. Information is a course on Anthropology by that professor. But who had the time (or the money) to take a course? You usually have to get accepted to a degree program before you can even take one. Then there's the whole needing-to-pay-the-bills thing. So work will get in the way of classes. Even if you could finagle your schedule and take a night class, the commuting will wear on you fast. Believe me, I speak from experience. So what's a person interested in getting some information to do? Why take a MOOC, that's what!

    "What on Earth is a MOOC?" you ask? It stands for Massively Open Online CourseOk, I realize that didn't clear much up. Allow me to elaborate. 

    • The Massively part refers to the fact that there is often 1000s of students signed up for a course.
    • The Open part refers to the fact that it's FREE! (Be warned, though, it seems there's a trend making some courses cost.)
    • The Online part refers to the fact that all course materials are on the internet.
    • The Course part refers to, well, the fact that it's a class; complete with readings, homework, tests, etc.

    As with everything on the internet, you must be careful when you sign up for one of these. Just because it's freely available doesn't mean it's worth your time. You can't trust everything you read on the internet. Luckily, such universities as Standford and MIT were at the forefront of MOOCs. The majority of the MOOC sites will contain courses from professors of reknowned universities. So the information in a MOOC is usually trustworthy.

    That said, these courses are not for college credit, though another trend is playing with the idea of making MOOCs for credit. That's where the whole non-open trend comes into play as well. It's still a new enough technology trend that MOOCs are changing constantly. The course themselves, how they're offered, what they're worth are all in flux. But if you're interested in learning for learning's sake, then it can't hurt to check out some of the sites. And we can help.

    If you go here: http://www.wilmlibrary.org/databases and expand the Online Courses section, you'll see two examples of MOOC sites: Coursera and EdX. If you have taken a MOOC, or know someone who has, please leave a comment and let us know how it went.

  • Posted on Tuesday, June 24, 2014 - 3:39pm

    We're always on the lookout for new resources to pass along and we're happy to have found Digital Learn. Founded by the Public Library Association with a grant from the Institute of Museum and Library Services, it was created to serve as "an online hub for digital literacy support and training." Right now the topics covered are:

    • Getting Started on the Computer
    • Using a PC
    • Using a Mac
    • Basic Search
    • Navigating a Web Site
    • Intro to Email (2 parts)
    • Online Job Searching
    • Cloud Storage
    • Intro to Facebook

    The topics are delivered in classes with slides accompanied by audio. Each class is covered in a series of "chapters" if you will. You can stop and replay the chapters whenever you need.

    The time each topic will take to complete is listed as well as how long each chapter will take. That way if you only have 10 minutes to spare, you know that you can complete the 6 minute Navigating a Web Site class. 

    Lastly, you can download a pdf of the class. It comes will all the slides and a transcript of the audio. That way if you're stuck on something you can refer to the pdf for the answer without having to hop back on the site.

    So try it out by going to Research & Learning on the left and then clicking the Spotlight: Digital Learn under Online Resources.  Or you can go there directly by clicking this link:  http://digitallearn.org/

    Let us know what you think! (Contact Us)

  • Posted on Tuesday, April 29, 2014 - 9:46am

    You may have heard of Monster.com. Perhaps you’ve even heard of Indeed.com. But have you ever heard of Glassdoor.com? If not, allow us to change that.

    So much of today’s job searching is done online and Monster is a giant among sites. Yet, Glassdoor offers one feature that Monster is lacking: company reviews. Taking a page from the social media playbook, Glassdoor allows people to share their thoughts, specifically on their employers. This is an indisputable benefit to job searchers. Doing your homework on the company with which you have an interview is something that is often overlooked. Most interviewees (yours truly included) are a jumble of nerves when interviewing. So it’s often forgotten that not only are you being interviewed by the employer but you’re interviewing the employer as well. And what better way to help you with your interview questions than to get the scoop from someone who has worked there already.

    For example, here’s Best Buy’s review page: http://www.glassdoor.com/Reviews/Best-Buy-Reviews-E97.htm

    Glassdoor has the usual job postings, interview tips, and resume writing help as well. So you’ll find all sorts of goodies when you’re looking for that next job and your friendly neighborhood library is here to help.

    If you click the Research and Learning button on the left side of the home page and then click the More Sources by Topic link, you’ll be brought a page of links. Click Business to expand that section and you’ll see the link to Glassdoor.  We hope it will prove a useful site the next time you’re looking for a job.

  • Posted on Tuesday, December 11, 2012 - 10:00am

    Wilmington High School yearbooks have been digitized and are now available online via the Internet Archive. The collection includes issues from the 1940s through the 2000s. Click here to view.

  • Posted on Thursday, February 16, 2012 - 3:58pm

    Assistant Adult Services Librarian Jenny Arch recommends that you check out these websites:

    Europe
    EuroCheapo
    EuroTrip
    Travel Beyond Vacations

    Asia
    Travelfish

    Hotels & Hostels 
    Hostelling International 
    Hostel Bookers
    RealTravel

    Accommodation & Transportation
    BootsnAll
    Kayak

    Alternative Travel
    Couch Surfing 

  • Posted on Friday, January 20, 2012 - 12:17pm

    Wilmington cardholders now have access to Cypress Resume, a online resume builder. Click here to get started. Resumes can be saved as PDFs.

  • Posted on Wednesday, January 11, 2012 - 10:20am

    The Wilmington Town Crier microfilm (1955-2010) will not be available in February, March, or April 2012. The microfilm is being scanned as part of our newspaper digitization project. Online access to past issues, including full-text keyword searching, will be available this summer.